Monday, 12 August 2013

Pat's Decadent and Delicious Scones

My friend, Denise, is a tea expert.  She knows EVERYTHING about tea and all the accoutrements that go with it.  Take a look at her charming blog, TEA IN ENGLAND and you will understand what I mean.  Denise is a graduate of the UK Tea Council Tea Masterclass and has been designated as a London Destination Specialist by the Travel Institute.   So when she offered to share her favourite scone recipe with me I jumped at the chance! With Denise's Afternoon Tea expertise, I knew this was going to be a great recipe.  


This is a scone with an interesting past.  Denise got this recipe from her good friend, Pat, who ran a tearoom back in the United States.  Pat learned how to make these scones from her Scottish grandmother.  Now the recipe has made the trans-Atlantic voyage back to Britain.  Thanks to Pat and Denise, I am going to share it with you....


I called these Pat's Decadent and Delicious Scones because of one special ingredient in the recipe,  HEAVY CREAM, the kind you can whip!  So if you are ready to whip up a batch of decadent, deliciousness I'll share the recipe with you.  This is exactly how Pat wrote the recipe when she shared it with Denise:

2 cups all purpose flour
1 Tablespoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
3 Tablespoons sugar
4 ounces cold unsalted butter cut into small pieces
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
3/4 to 1 cup heavy whipping cream (double cream)

Optional Ingredients:
1/2 to 1 cup dried fruit/nuts

Pat says:

I use a food processor and put the first four ingredients in and pulse a couple of times to mix them together.  Then I add the butter pieces and pulse a few times to work them in.  If I am adding any zest, I put that in before the butter.

I then dump that into a ceramic bowl, that is cold.  If I am adding things like nuts, raisins or other dried fruits I add those next, so they are coated with the flour mixture. I then add the cream to which I have added the vanilla and mixed. 

Pour MOST of the cream into the flour mixture and start mixing it in with a wooden spoon.  This is the tricky part that is hard to explain.  Add more of the cream until the dough comes together.  This is where you will have to switch to your hands.  In pretty much one big blob, put it on a lightly (flour) dusted surface.  I usually work the dough in 2 pieces.  Pat it out with your hands into a 1/2 inch thick round and cut into triangles or 2 inch circles.   If I am cutting circles I do all the dough at once and then work the scraps together and re-cut.  If I am doing triangles I do two rounds.  


Before baking: Place the scones on a baking sheet, about 1/2 inch apart and place in the fridge for at least 15 minutes.  

Preheat the oven to 425F/ 220C.  Bake for 13-15 minutes.  Ovens vary so the time will also vary.  

Optional but suggested: brush tops of scones before baking with an egg wash or cream.


Reading Pat's recipe is like baking with a friend, comfortable and easy to understand.  I must confess, I didn't use a food processor but my trusty pastry making tool.  When forming the scones I left the dough a bit thicker than Pat suggested, more like 3/4 to 1 inch thick.  These were the lightest, fluffiest scones I've ever made!


Thank you Denise and Pat for sharing the recipe for these delicious, decadent and delectable scones.  From now on they are going to be served regularly at our afternoon tea.  

24 comments:

  1. These look gorgeous and I bet with even more cream inside (and a little jam) they will be delicious! xx

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    1. I have to say, I enjoyed eating one of these scones warm from the oven without ANY jam or cream. I hope you give this recipe a try. : )x

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  2. Lovely, Debs. They look sooooo good. As always, your pictures are mouth-watering! What I love about this recipe is that it's great on its own - but also serves as an excellent base for optional ingredients. I've shared your link with the infamous Pat, and am sure she'll drop by with a comment soon. x (Thanks for the shout-out.)

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    1. Thank you, Denise! I can't wait to bake these scones again, adding a few little extras like chocolate or dried fruit. It's been great collaborating with you. I hope we can do it again. : )x

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  3. Deb, you have done my recipe proud. Thank you so much. I also often start mine taller than 1/2". Depends on the humidity.
    ~pat

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    1. Hi Pat, it's lovely to meet you. Thank you so much for sharing your delicious scone recipe with us. It has already become a family favourite in our house. Denise told me your scones were fabulous... she was SO right! I can't wait to bake them again.

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    2. Deb, it is a pleasure to meet you also. I will be doing a lemon poppyseed version this weekend to share with friends while scrapbooking.

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    3. Lemon and poppyseed sounds delicious!

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  4. Thanks, Debs, for posting this scrumptious-looking scone recipe! I've been looking for one that is delicious and authentic and this looks to be it! Love your connection with my fave, Denise!

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    1. Hi Karen-

      Thank you for visiting the blog. It was my pleasure baking and eating Pat's lovely scones. I know you will enjoy them too. Denise is a lovely, generous lady who has great taste in the tea and SCONE department! ; )

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    1. I have to say, they are lovely. I am so pleased Denise and Pat shared the recipe with us.

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  6. I am very jealous that I didn't meet your recipe before I found out I was allergic to wheat. I'm still going to save it. maybe my friends will like it when we have tea. LOL Kitty

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    1. Allergic, oh no! You will have to have just a TINY nibble. Your friends will LOVE them. : )

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    2. Kitty, I have a number of friends who are either allergic to wheat or have gluten sensitivity, so I develop a lot of gluten-free recipes. I just recently posted my gluten-free scones. Hope you get this message; I couldn't see how to contact you directly.

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  7. I've been reading your blog for a while now; these scones sound delish! In case you're still interested in trying additional recipes, here's a link you might enjoy ... http://ivyphyllisandme.blogspot.com/2013/05/english-scones.html

    Sharon in Alabama

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    1. Hi Sharon!

      Thanks for visiting our blog. It's lovely to meet you. I've had a quick look at the link you suggested and it is charming. I know I am going to enjoy reading more.

      Thanks again,
      Debs

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  8. Lovely, lovely! I DO love a good scone. I also make mine into two rounds cut into wedges (like my mother and grandmother before me). So many bakeries use shortening rather than butter, and they are horrible. And please don't sully my scone with chocolate chips! :D Dried fruit only, please.

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    1. Thanks Jean! There is something about scones cut into wedges...they just look more tempting. Your Mum and Grandmother were right. : )

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  9. Debs, thanks for sharing this awesome recipe. I made them yesterday and they are the best I have ever baked or eaten.
    Sarah

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    1. I am so pleased you enjoyed them! My friend, Denise, says this is the only scone recipe she EVER uses. I am going to experiment with different dried fruits and even some chocolate chips. I hear these are great made with dried apricots and white chocolate chunks.

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  10. I made these a few days ago & they were delicious! Thanks for sharing!

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    1. I am glad you liked them. I knew we were going to bake something special when Denise suggested the recipe.

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  11. Ooh those scones do look good and isn't it great how recipes travel around the world. I have bookmarked these for the next time I make scones.

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